FindLaw: Hurricane Katrina Victims' Lawsuit Against the Federal Government and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

 


Hurricane Katrina Victims' Lawsuit Against the
Federal Government and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Norman Robinson, Kent Lattimore, Lattimore & Associates,
Tanya Smith, Anthony Franz, Jr., and Lucile Franz v.
United States of America and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

April 25, 2006

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Lawyers
  • U.S. Attorney's Office - Cleveland, Ohio
  • Jonathan Andry, Co-Counsel For Plaintiffs
  • John T. Balhoff, II, Co-Counsel For Plaintiffs
  • Joseph M. Bruno, Co-Counsel For Plaintiffs
  • O'Donnell Shaeffer Mortimer LLP, Co-Counsel For Plaintiffs
  • J.J. McKernan, Co-Counsel For Plaintiffs
  • Mitchell CLay, Co-Counsel for Defendants
  • U.S. Justice Dept. Civil Division, Environmental Torts Sction
  • Theodore L. Hunt, for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineeers


  • Related Links:
  • FindLaw's Real Estate Center
  • Construction Defects and the Law
  • N.Y. Times: Lawsuit Against Army Corps Over Katrina Begins


  • New Orleans property owners sued the federal government and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, alleging that they knew or should have known that the Mississippi Gulf River Outlet's ('MR-GO') "design was flawed" by failing to account for the channel's "inherent and known capability of serving as a funnel or conduit [during] storm surges" and how they affected levees in New Orleans and St. Bernard Parsish.

    The plaintiffs owned homes, businesses, and property that was destroyed during Hurricane Katrina. They content that the storm flooding caused by an improperly constructed MR-GO destroyed their homes, property, businesses, and changed their lives for the worse.

    The plaintiffs also alleged that the Army Corps of Engineers "failed to 'armor' levees on both banks of the MR-GO." Armoring is a process used to construct a stronger, water-resistant lawyer on the levee or waterbank to guard against "pounding by waves [during a] wind-driven storm surge;" and 2) to help prevent 'overtopping' caused during the surges that could make soil unstable and cause structures to collapse.

    You can read the Katrina property owners’s lawsuit below:

     

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