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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BRADLEY COUNTY, TENNESSEE FOR

THE TENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

JOHN C. ODEN, JR.; and
JAMES GREER, Individually, and on
behalf of all similarly situated persons,

Plaintiff,

v.

TAYLOR FUNDER HOMES OF
CHATTANOOGA, INCORPORATED;
FRANKLIN-STRICKLAND FUNERAL
HOME, INC. and all similarly situated
Tennessee funeral homes who sent corpses
to TRI-STATE CREMATORY;
TRI-STATE CREMATORY, INC.; and
T. RAY BRENT MARSH,

Defendants.

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CLASS ACTION COMPLAINT

PARTIES

      1. Plaintiff Joe C. Oden, Jr. is a citizen and resident of Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee. He is the surviving spouse of Jerlean B. Oden, deceased, who died on December 20, 2001.

      2. Plaintiff James Greer is a citizen and resident of East Ridge, Hamilton County, Tennessee. He is the surviving father of Gregory Wayne Greer who died on February 9, 2002 (at age 37). Mr. Greer made arrangements for cremation with Defendant Franklin-Strickland Funeral Home, Inc. in Chattanooga, Tennessee

      3. Defendant Taylor Funeral Home of Chattanooga, Inc. is a Tennessee corporation with its principal place of business at 3417 Wilcox Boulevard, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37411. Defendants Taylor Funeral Home of Chattanooga, Inc. may be served

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through its agent: John R. Taylor, Sr., 3417 Wilcox Boulevard, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37411.

      4. Defendant Franklin-Strickland Funeral Home, Inc. is a Tennessee corporation with its principal place of business at 812 Centeral Avenue, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37403. Defendant Franklin-Strickland Funeral Homes, Inc. may be served with process through its registered agent: John R. Anderson, 900 Republic Center, 633 Chestnut Street, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37450.

      5. Defendant Tri-State Crematory, Inc. is a Georgia corporation with its principal place of business in Noble, Georgia. Tri-State Crematory, Inc. may be served by service on its registered agent: Tommy R. Marsh, Rt. 4, Box 1170A, LaFayette, Georgia 30728.

      6. Defendant T. Ray Brent Marsh is a citizen and resident of Lafayette, Georgia 30728. He is the manager and Secretary of Tri-State Crematory, Inc. He may be served with process at: Rt. 4, Box 1170A, LaFayette, Georgia 30728. agent: C T Corporation System, Kentucky Home Life Building, Louisville, Kentucky 40202.

      7. This suit seeks certification of a Defendants' class for all Tennessee funderal homes who sent bodies to Tri-State Crematory, Inc., an unlicensed and unlawful cremation facility in Noble and/or Rock Springs, Georgia.

FACTUAL BACKGROUND

      8. This is a class-action complaint that arises from the "depravity" of an unlicensed crematory operator, Tri-State Crematory, in Noble, Georgia that disposed of human remains (that were supposed to be properly cremated) by strewing human bodies in "vaults" and wooded areas in violation of all applicable laws and norms of human decency. The Defendants in this case include the unlicensed cremation company (Tri-State Crematory, Inc.) ("Tri-State") and its manager (Ray Brent Marsh) as well as the funeral companies (including parent corporations and affiliates) who contracted

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with Tri-State to cut costs and evade state laws. The suit alleges breach of contract; breach of fiduciary duty; fraud and deceit; negligent misrepresentation; intentional mishandling of human remains; negligent handling of human remains; negligence and negligence per se; conspiracy to defraud; conspiracy to mishandle remains; deceptive trade practices; and punitive damages.

      9. Plaintiff avers that the Defendants' class engaged in a pattern and practice of illegal conduct, fraud and/or deceptive practices in connection with the Georgia crematorium scandal by charging consumers in Tennessee for cremations that by law were required to be done by licensed persons and firms, but then evading the law by hiring an unlicensed (and unethical) Georgia crematorium operator (Tri-State Crematory). Further, Georgia law directly prohibits incineration or cremation of bodies without a proper license. See Ga. St. 31-21-5 (attached as Exhibit A). This shameful conduct was done solely for profit with the knowledge (direct or constructive) that Tri-State operated without a license and did not employ licensed personnel.

      10. Plaintiff avers that Defendants contracted and charged families for cremation services and then engaged Tri-State Crematory, a business located near Noble, Georgia to perform the cremations. The Tri-State Crematory, operated by Defendant Marsh, contracted or did business with Defendants' funeral homes, including for the alleged purpose of crematory bodies. However, in fraudulent and/or illegal and unconscionable fashion, The Defendants' agent (Tri-State) literally dumped corpses into crematory storage sheds or in the woods. Further Tri-State vop;ated Ga. St. 31-21-5.

      11. Plaintiff avers that Tri-State Crematory is an unlicensed and illegal facility and according to the former Walker County, Georgia coroner, a complaint (or complaints) had been filed with the State of Georgia concerning this facility. However, the complaints did not result in shutting down Tri-State. Tri-State was not licensed and no state licensed funeral director was present at the facility. According to published

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reports, former coroner, Bill McGil, suggested the problems with the crematory and related complaints in the early 1990s that Tri-State was not licensed and did not have a state licensed funeral director on the premises. Defendants knew or should have known that this facility was not a proper and lawful agent for the disposal of human remains.

      12. Plaintiff avers that Defendants' class had a legal non-delegable duty to dispose of human remains through a licensed and qualified (competent) facility and further had a contractual and legal responsibility to investigate with due diligence to determine the services it was "hiring out" Tri-State Crematory were being lawfully and ethically performed. In gross and unconscionable dereliction of its contractual and legal duties, Defendants wholly failed to investigate the practices of the Tri-State Crematory and failed to assure that the contracted for services were being provided. Defendants were on notice of complaints against Tri-State Crematory and were also on notice of the unlicensed nature of this facility. Defendants were further on notice of the extremely low rates being charged by Tri-State Crematory which should have made them aware of questionable business practices.

      13. On December 20, 2001, Jerlean B. Oden died. [FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS & CREMATION ARRANGEMENTS].

      14. On February 9, 2002, at the age of 37, Gregory Wayne Greer died. [FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS & CREMATION].

      15. Plaintiffs allege that because there was fraud and/or misrepresentation and recklessness, that this is an appropriate case to pierce the corporate veil or hold parent and affiliate corporations liable under theories of alter-ego, domination, control, agency by estoppel, fraud, misrepresentation and unconscionability. It was at all times represented to the deceased families that their loved ones' bodies would be cremated in a respectful and ethical manner in accordance with state laws. In fact, their bodies were not cremated and, as recent news events have detailed, numerous unburied bodies have been found at the site of the Tri-State Crematory in Northwest Georgia.

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The Governor of Georgia has declared Walker County a disaster area and has accused the crematory operator of "depravity."

      16. T.C.A. 62-5-101, et seq. establishes rules and regulations for funeral directors and embalmers. Under Tennessee law it is an absolute requirement to safeguard life, safety and health that only properly qualified and licensed persons can engage in the disposal of human remains. See T.C.A. 62-5-303 and 62-5-101(3)(A). Similar laws exist in other southeastern states. Licensing requirements are detailed under Tennessee law and include requirements for continuing education and ethics. See Rules of the Tennessee Board of Funeral Directors and Embalmers, Ch. 0660-10. It is specifically prohibited that a person who is not duly registered and licensed as a funeral director cannot engage in funeral directing ( or embalming. See T.C.A. 62-5-309. It is further required that no employee or member of any firm or corporation shall engage in the care, preparation, disposal or burial of dead human bodies unless the employer member is a licensed funeral director. See T.C.A. 62-5-313 ("Requirements for Operation."). Similar requirements exist in other states. Under Tennessee law there are requirements that the license issued to a funeral establishment be for a period of two years, and is not transferrable or assignable. T.C.A. 62-5-315. Grounds for the suspension, denial or revocation of a license under T.C.A. 62-5-317(5) include if an application or holder of a funeral license "knowingly permits an unlicensed person to engage in the profession or business of funeral director or embalming under the applicant's or holders supervision." Under Tennessee law funeral directing includes the "practice of preparing human bodies for burial by any means" including "the disposition of dead human bodies." T.C.A. 62-5-101(3)(A)(I). T.C.A. 62-5-317(b)(1) also prohibits misrepresentation or fraud in the conduct of the business of the funeral establishment. T.C.A. 62-5-504 also provides detailed rules and duties on the operators of crematory facilities. See T.C.A. 62-5-504, et seq., including 62-5-507. Tennessee law requires that no operator of a crematory facility shall fail to cremate in its

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entirety with the body, the casket or container. Plaintiffs aver Defendants violated these statutory provisions are therefore committed negligence per se.

      17. These elaborate requirements under state laws exist to ensure that unlicensed and unqualified persons who may not be ethical will not be permitted to dispose of human bodies. It was the duty of the Defendant funeral homes to ensure complete and lawful compliance. Instead, the Defendants chose to profit and look the other way (or not look at all).

      18. In dereliction of these duties, Defendants wholly failed to cremate the bodies of Jerlean B. Oden, Gregory Wayne Greer and numerous others. Defendants- contracted with, or caused, Tri-State Crematory to accept bodies for cremation. This was despite the fact that this facility was unlicensed and made no effort to comply with state law concerning the licensing of facilities to dispose of human bodies. This fact was known or should have been known to all Defendants at all times. Defendants sent bodies across state lines (passing numerous licensed crematory facilities) in a shameless effort to place profit and money above solemn, statutory, contractual, and ethical duties to properly dispose of the remains of loved ones in a solemn and sanctified manner by cremation. Defendants acted recklessly and/or with fraud by selling burial and cremation policies and obtaining fees for cremation with no, or inadequate, assurance that cremation would be carried out in accordance with the controlling laws. CLASS ACTION ALLEGATIONS

      19. This action is properly maintainable as a plaintiffs' class action under Rule 23 of the Tennessee Rules of Civil Procedure. The Class is a nationwide class of all "victims of the Tri-State Crematory" which is defined as all consumers of Defendants' cremation services consisting of all statutory beneficiaries under state survival statutes or other laws pertaining to cremation and intestate succession of property for decedents (including all surviving spouses, surviving children and surviving parents) see e,g,, T.C.A. 62-5-501. The Class includes all such "beneficiaries" for all deceased persons who purchased or were covered by Defendants' burial/cremation contracts and all such "beneficiaries" for all deceased

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persons whose families purchased cremation services at Defendants' funeral homes and/or cemeteries.

      20. The class is so numerous that joinder of all members is impracticable. The numbers of class members is unknown to the Plaintiff, but can be determined from the records maintained by Defendants or Tri-State Crematory. Upon information and belief, the class consists of hundreds of persons residing in Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama and other states throughout the United States.

      21. The claims of the Plaintiffs are typical of the claims of the class, and the Plaintiff has no claims that are antagonistic to those of the class.

      22. The Plaintiffs will fairly and adequately represent the members of the class and have retained counsel who are competent and experienced in class actions and complex litigation and have agreed to advance the expenses of this class action lawsuit.

      23. A class action is superior to other methods for the fair and efficient adjudication of this controversy. Furthermore, although the damages suffered by many individual members of the class may be distinct, the expense and burden of individual litigation may make it difficult, if not impossible, for all members of the class to address the wrongs done to them individually. Many class members may not be aware that claims exist against the Defendants. There will be no unusual difficulty in the management of this action as a class action.

      24. Common questions of law and fact exist and predominate over questions affecting only individual members of the class.

      25. Common questions of law and fact with respect to the class include, but are not limited to:

          1. Did Defendants breach their contract to class members or decedents by charging them for cremations that were not performed by Tri-State Crematory?

          2. Did Defendants breach their contract with class members by charging them for cremations even through Defendants knew or should have known cremations would not be performed based upon Defendants' wholesale failure of due diligence to investigate?

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          3. Did Defendants breach their duty of good faith and fair dealing when they charged them for cremations and concealed from them the fact that cremations did not occur without proper assurance, verification or licensing?

          4. Did Defendants engage in false, fraudulent, or deceptive business practices detailed in state consumer protection laws?

          5. Did Defendants fraudulently conceal or recklessly fail to disclose the egregious practices of Tri-State Crematory?

          6. Did Defendants commit negligence per se and/or recklessness per se by violations concerning funeral directors or funeral homes?

COUNT I: BREACH OF CONTRACT AGAINST ALL DEFENDANTS

      26. The allegations of paragraph 1 through 25 are incorporated as if fully set forth herein.

      27. By contracting with class members or the decedents to perform cremations and/or by selling policies of burial or cremation, Defendants breached their contract by failing to perform cremations and by negligently contracting and delegating cremation to an unlicensed, unqualified agency, Tri-State Crematory in Georgia. Defendants had a non-delegable duty and statutory duty to ensure that there was proper disposal of human remains by cremation which required a licensed facility to engage in these activities. At all times, this facility was not licensed and Defendants knew or should have known this fact and should have engaged in due diligence to determine if cremations were in fact occurring. Instead, Defendants placed profit above human health, life and safety.

      28. As a direct and proximate cause of Defendants' breaches of its contractual agreements, Plaintiff has suffered substantial damages and losses, including mental distress, pain and suffering.

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COUNT II: CLAIM FOR BREACH OF FIDUCIARY DUTY AGAINST DEFENDANTS

      29. The allegations of paragraphs 1 through 28 are incorporated as if fully set forth herein.

      30. Defendants breached their fiduciary duties to the relationship with Plaintiffs and the class. As a direct and proximate result of their breaches of fiduciary duty, Plaintiffs and the class have suffered substantial damages, losses and injuries.

COUNT III: FRAUD AND/OR DECEIT

      31. The allegations of paragraphs 1 through 30 are incorporated as if fully set forth herein.

      32. Defendants' conduct, as described above, was undertaken with fraud and deceit (and/or negligent misrepresentation as set forth below). Plaintiffs and/or the class were charged for cremations which did not occur. Plaintiffs and/or the class were charged with burial/cremation policies which did not provide for the services charged. Defendants concealed these facts and/or recklessly failed to determine the truth of the facts by hiring unlicensed and unqualified persons and/or firms to supposedly conduct cremations, including the Tri-State Crematory in Georgia. Defendants acted recklessly and/or with fraud or deceit and/or in reckless disregard of the interests of the Plaintiffs in the class. As a direct and proximate result of fraud and deceit and/or negligent misrepresentation Plaintiff and the class have suffered substantial damages, losses and injuries.

COUNT IV: NEGLIGENT MISREPRESENTATION

      33. The allegations of paragraphs 1 through 32 are incorporated as if fully set forth herein.

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      34. Defendants knowingly accepted money to obtain cremation and benefitted from the receipt of this payment and knew or should have known that the cremations were not occurring through Defendants reckless and/or negligent acts. Based upon the foregoing Defendants are liable to the Plaintiff and the class for negligent misrepresentation. As a direct and proximate result of negligent misrepresentation, Plaintiff and the class have suffered substantial damages, losses and injuries.

COUNTS V & VI: INTENTIONAL AND NEGLIGENT MISHANDLING OF BODIES

      35. The allegations of paragraphs 1 through 34 are incorporated as if fully set forth herein.

      36. Defendants intentionally and/or negligently mishandled corpses. Defendants knew or should have known that cremations were not being carried out by Tri-State Crematory. Defendants also contracted with Tri-State Crematory under economic terms so favorable it should have caused a reasonable person to believe that services could not be provided adequately, ethically at the rates charged. Defendants arbitrarily and capriciously failed to investigate to determine if the party with whom they were contracting Tri-State Crematory was licensed or qualified to perform cremation. As a direct and proximate result of intentionally and/or negligently mishandled corpses, Plaintiff and the class have suffered substantial damages, losses and injuries.

COUNTS VII AND VIII: NEGLIGENCE AND NEGLIGENCE PER SE

      37. The allegations of paragraphs 1 through 36 are incorporated as if fully set forth herein.

      38. Defendants acted negligently and violated the statutes set forth above, thus invoking the doctrine of negligence per se. As a direct and proximate result of negligence and negligence per se, Plaintiffs and the class have suffered substantial damages, losses and injuries.

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COUNTS IX AND X: CONSPIRACY TO DEFRAUD AND CONSPIRACY TO MISHANDLE BODIES.

      39. The allegations of paragraphs 1 through 38 are incorporated as if fully set forth herein.

      40. Defendants conspired and agreed by contract, plan or other agreement to transport bodies to Noble, Georgia to an unlicensed crematory facility under circumstances that amount to a conspiracy to defraud, misrepresent and mishandle corpses. Accordingly joint and several liability principles apply. As a direct and proximate result of these conspiracies, Plaintiffs and the class have suffered substantial damages, losses and injuries.

COUNT XI: DECEPTIVE TRADE PRACTICES

      41. The allegations of paragraphs 1 through 40 are incorporated as if fully set forth herein.

      42. The actions of Defendants constitute deceptive and unfair trade practices within the meaning of T.C.A. 56-8-104 (1994) and 47-18-101, et seq. Defendants falsely promised cremations and the proper carrying out of burial/cremation policies yet made no, or a wholly insubstantial, effort to determine that the persons to whom the bodies were given for cremation met the statutory criteria and licensing. Accordingly, Defendants are liable under theories of deceptive trade practices.

COUNT XII: PUNITIVE DAMAGES

      43. The allegations of paragraphs 1 through 42 are incorporated as if fully set forth herein.

      44. Defendants acted with deliberate and/or reckless disregard for the rights of the Plaintiffs and class. These acts were willful and/or wanton or reckless for their own self-interest. Defendants should be held liable for punitive damages.

DEMAND FOR JURY TRIAL

     45. A jury trial is demanded.

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PRAYER FOR RELIEF

      WHEREFORE, Plaintiffs, individually and on behalf of the class, request the following relief:

      1. Certifying this action as a class action of affected persons throughout the United States.

      2. Awarding Plaintiffs and the Class damages in the amount of One Hundred Million Dollars ($100,000,000.00).

      3. Granting Plaintiffs and the Class attorneys' fees and interest, including pre-judgment interest, post-judgment interest, costs and disbursements herein.

      4. Awarding Plaintiffs and the Class treble damages based upon the Defendants' willful and intentional disregard of their rights, or in the alternative, punitive damages based upon the Defendants' willful, intention and/or reckless disregard for their rights.

      5. Granting such other relief that the Court may direct.





Respectfully Submitted,

DAVID RANDOLPH SMITH & ASSOCIATES


By: _______________________________________
David Randolph Smith #011905
Edmund J. Schmidt, III #021313
J. Allen Murphy, Jr. #019146
1910 Acklen Avenue
Hillsboro Village
Nashville, Tennessee 37212
(615) 742-1775
web: http://www.drslawfirm.com
e-mail: dsmith@drslawfirm.com

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COST BOND

      We are surety for the costs in this cause not to exceed One Thousand Dollars ($1,000).





____________________________________
David Randolph Smith
DAVID RANDOLPH SMITH & ASSOCIATES






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